Brain teasers to stretch your gifted and talented children

These will appeal to all children, and stretch the more able pupils in your class

(Are you stuck? The answers are at the bottom of the blog!)

  1. Two mothers and two daughters were quilting in the living room. They all quilted busily all day, and discussed memories they had shared with each other. Each one completed a quilt. However, at the end of the day there were only three completed quilts. How is this possible?
  2. A man was sitting at home watching the news. All of a sudden, he stood up, switched on the light, and began to sob uncontrollably. Why did the man switch on the light and begin to cry? Ask as many questions as you would like, but the teacher can only answer yes or no.
  3. Two Australians got on a bus. One of the Australians was the father of the other Australian’s son. How was this possible?
  4. Robert and William Parry were both born just before noon on 7th May 2001. They had the same parents, Andrew and Diana Parry. You see Robert and William in the nursery and say to Diana, “Your twins are lovely!’ Diana looks at you and replies, “They are not twins!” You are very confused. They were born on exactly the same day with the same parents! How is this possible?
  5. Two men walk into a restaurant. They both order exactly the same drink. One man drinks it fast and one man drinks it slowly. The one who drinks it fast lives. The one who drinks it slowly dies. WHY?

These brainteasers have been taken from Brilliant Activities for Gifted and Talented Children by Ashley McCabe Mowat, which contains tasks that will develop all children’s cognitive abilities, whilst stretching the most able pupils in you class.

 

Answers

  1. They were a grandmother, mother and a daughter.
  2. The man is a lighthouse keeper, and he saw on the news that a ship is headed for his point but can see no light. It is inevitable that the ship will crash, which is the man’s fault.
  3. One was the mother.
  4. They are not twins, but triplets!
  5. There was poison in the ice.

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Filed under Gifted and Talented, Key Stage 2, Primary school, Uncategorised

10 great memory tricks for when to use un/une in French

Try these tips for remembering whether a noun is feminine or masculine in French. Developing memory tricks, especially those that that paint a picture in your mind, is an ideal way of learning and remembering key  language points.

  1. Most feminine nouns end in an “e” and most masculine nouns don’t. Feminine nouns use “une” and masculine nouns use “un”.
  2. “Frère”, “père” and “grandpère” all end in an “e” but you can obviously only use “un”because they are masculine words.
  3. Even though “soeur” ends with a consonant you could obviously only use “une” with it because a sister is female.
  4. Traditionally flowers are given to women. That’s why “fleur” can only be feminine.
  5. Traditionally women didn’t go out to work and used to stay at home. That’s why “maison” can only be feminine.
  6. Think of women watching more television because they haven’t gone out to work. That’s why “télévision” is feminine. Also, the television is in the house and “maison” is feminine.
  7. “Une télévision” will also help you remember that other nouns that end in “ion”, such as “une question” and “une correction”, are also feminine.
  8. Remember that for many centuries education was reserved exclusively for men. They were the only ones allowed to open books. That’s why “livre” can only be masculine.
  9. Think of the important role of the telephone in business, traditionally a male domain. That’s why “téléphone” can only be masculine.
  10. Remember that it can only be acceptable for men to drink alcohol and it’s been proven that men can absorb more alcohol than women. That is why a glass, “un verre”, is masculine.

These ideas have been taken from Unforgettable French written by Marie Rice-Jones. Unforgettable French can be used by anyone learning French grammar, from the basics up to GCSE level.

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Sheila Blackburn is interviewed by Ink Pantry

Sheila Blackburn, author of Sam’s Football Stories and Stewie Scraps, has just been interviewed by Ink Pantry. Read Sheila’s interview here.

Ink Pantry Publishing evolved from a social media group of creative writing students from The Open University who wanted to create an inspiring and supportive platform for new writers.

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Using the Two-spoon Method in Cooking

Once you know how to use two spoons to get your cookie or biscuit mixture onto a baking tray, it is easy to do. But what is the best way to teach children this essential cooking skill?

Kate Morris and Sally Brown, authors of Get Cooking in the Classroom, have created a great video to help teach children the two-spoon method.

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Filed under Healthy eating, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE, Teaching Ideas

Brilliant new MFL resources

Our new MFL catalogue is now available! Click here to download your copy.

 

brilliant-primary-mfl-catalogue-2017

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), News

The Bridge Method of Cutting

Once you know how to cut ingredients safely using the bridge method, it is easy to do. But what is the best way to teach children this essential cooking skill?

Kate Morris and Sally Brown, authors of Get Cooking in the Classroom, have created a great video to help teach children how to use the bridge method.

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Filed under Healthy eating, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE, Teaching Ideas

Need to do an assembly? Don’t panic!

Our new assemblies catalogue is now available! Click here to download a copy.

Our lassemblies-catalogueatest assembly book, Modern Christian Assembly Stories written by Gary Nott, is now available. This collection has 50 contemporary stories, all with a Christian theme, making it ideal for schools wishing to ensure that their collective worship is, in the main, Christian.

Here are just some of the characters you will meet:

  • Billy loses his trunks whilst swimming at school – how embarrassing! What will he do? Listen to his hilarious story.
  • David is missing his best friend, who has left school. Then he meets Arthur, the new boy. Arthur is different. He is autistic: he canʼt speak. How can David make friends with him?
  • Joshua is fascinated with fire but one day goes too far and sets light to his school. What will his headteacher and parents say?
  • Katherine is excited when she is chosen to be head girl. Then she receives a poison pen letter from a jealous classmate. How will she cope with her disappointment?
  • Mr Ripple has an idea for a class assembly with a difference. He asks his class to bring their pets into school. Then things start to go wrong with consequences he could not have foreseen.

Don’t forget – there are sample assembly stories from all our assembly books on our website – so you can try before you buy!

9781783172283-modern-christian-assemblies-temp2

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