Number of children worrying about war and terror rises sharply

According to a recent study by Childwise, one in three children aged 9-16 are concerned about global events. War and terrorism were the two main areas of concern. This is a notable increase from 2015, when it was just one in four children.

Brilliant Publications publishes two books to help teachers to respond to children’s questions about terrorism. Talking about Terrorism is for teachers of 7-11 year olds and Radicalisation and Terrorism is for teachers of 11-14 year olds.

Talking about Terrorism by Alison Jamieson and Jane Flint

Talking about Terrorism

Radicalisation and Terrorism by Alison Jamieson and Jane Flint

Radicalisation and Terrorism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More information on the Childwise study can be found in this Guardian article:

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jan/31/children-worrying-about-war-terror-rises-sharply-uk

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Filed under Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism

From Outstanding, is the only way to go down?

‘Nobody wants to lead an outstanding school. There is nowhere to go other than down!’ So said an erudite colleague to me when I mentioned that I was looking to move on to lead another school. It was not without a small degree of trepidation therefore that I was appointed to my second headship a short while later – this time to lead an outstanding school. Two years in we were re-inspected and again achieved outstanding. The relief was palpable. When I had taken on the school, I felt it was no longer excellent – good, yes but outstanding no. In the space of two years we managed to get the data back to excellent – without it you won’t achieve the outstanding label. Although, perversely, having the data is by no means a guarantee of getting the accolade. What inspectors see in the classroom must reflect what the data suggests – excellent practice.

How to be a Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher by Gary Nott

How to be a Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher by Gary Nott

In my new book, How To be A Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher, I outline some of the facets of an outstanding school, whilst trying to describe some of the features that people attribute to outstanding leaders.

Two of these school features spring to mind in writing this blog entry.

Firstly, we coined the term Mentoring Mondays to describe our approach to supporting colleagues to develop their practice. I nabbed the idea from McDonald’s Fruit Fridays when sharing a snack with my son. On each Monday morning, we would release a teacher to observe a colleague teach an outstanding lesson. Then on the Monday afternoon, the released teacher would team teach a lesson to their own class alongside that outstanding colleague. The end of the day would be spent sharing key lessons learned during the day. Colleagues appreciated this investment in them. The cost of releasing colleagues from class responsibilities to benefit from such an exercise on the one day was easily offset by money saved from the external courses budget.

Secondly, we devised a simple way of tracking children’s progress in the school that was bespoke to our children. We took an aircraft flight as our analogy. We quantified progress and attainment using a points systems we devised and from this could calculate a class’s progress – which we called ‘speed’ – and their attainment – which we called ‘altitude’ – which we then brought together in what we called a cockpit summary. A class could be flying high and fast or low and slow. The visual representation of this on a cockpit dashboard led us to create flight plans for each class – showing where we wanted them to be (their destination) and when we expected their flight to land. Was their flight on time or likely to be delayed? Inspectors liked the idea and suggested that we go further and devise a flight plan summary for each child.

The difficult thing of course is maintaining the outstanding label. It can itself become somewhat of a cross to bear. Some staff feel that to maintain the high standard is not achievable if they are to maintain a healthy work-life balance. As the new Head of OFTSED considers dropping it from her armoury, there will be many in the profession keen to see it go. I have found that my own school has seen significant changes in the past five years. The percentage of children entering the school at below levels that are typical for age has doubled. This has brought new challenges – and opportunities to grow too. In such circumstances, to hold on to the outstanding label is a big ask. You have to keep reinventing yourself; if you stand still there is indeed only one way to go, as my former colleague said to me.

Guest blog by Gary Nott.

Gary Nott author of How to be a Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher

Gary Nott author of How to be a Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher

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Filed under Guest blog, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, School leadership

Free webinar – Physical French Phonics

Sue Cave will be giving a webinar on using Physical French Phonics in language learning and teaching.

Sue Cave Physical French Phonics Brilliant Publications

Sue Cave – author of Physical French Phonics

The webinar is being organised by the Association of Language Learning (ALL) London Branch. It is free to register and attend. It takes place on Wednesday, 15th November 8.30-9.30pm. Hope to see you there.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/physical-french-phonics-a-webinar-with-sue-cave-registration-38171520044?aff=erelpanelorg

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Filed under French, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3

Can you learn maths by playing card games?

We asked some children what they thought of Deck Ahoy. Here are just a few of the things they had to say:

Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications maths with a deck of cards Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications maths with a deck of cards Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications maths with a deck of cards“Deck Ahoy is much better than watching TV and cartoon shows because it shows different ways of how to do maths.” Angelica, age 8

“I like Deck Ahoy because it helps me with my maths and number bonds to 10 and 100. It can help you with your maths a lot.” Hadi, age 11

“I like Deck Ahoy because it helps me to learn maths and it helps me to add and subtract.” Sasha, age 8

“I can now partitiion and double 2-digit numbers.” Hersi

“I like Deck Ahoy because it helps me with maths and it’s so much fun!” Bilal, age 8

“It’s easy to learn time with Deck Ahoy.” Abed, age 7

“Deck Ahoy is fun and it is easy to learn maths.” Naomi, age 7

“Deck Ahoy will help everyone with maths and fractions. It’s awesome!” Cameron, age 10

“Deck Ahoy is very fun because every day I learn new stuff.” Ashley, age 7

Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications maths with a deck of cards“I like Deck Ahoy because it’s fun and it helps us to do our maths.” Charlotte, age 9

“Deck Ahoy is very fun and you can learn from it.” Gilbert, age 10

Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications 9781783171781

Deck Ahoy: Primary Mathematics Activities and Games Using Just a Deck of Cards

Deck Ahoy contains over 100 activities and games to teach primary maths skills with a just deck of cards – no need to buy expensive resources!

Deck Ahoy covers not only the main operations – addition, subtraction, multiplication and division – but also fractions, statistics, time, ratios, squares and cubes and graphs.

The ideas are great for homework as there are no worksheets needed (or marking to do!) and the whole family can get involved, any where, any time.

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Filed under Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Mathematics, Uncategorised

Fun French Fairy Tale Plays are brilliant!

We were delighted to receive the following comments from a Key Stage 2 teacher about Fun French Fairy Tale Plays:

Fun French Fairy Tale Plays - Brilliant Publications ISBN 9781783172450

Fun French Fairy Tale Plays

“Some of my Year 5 children performed Cendrillon and it went down a treat with the children and staff alike. The children found it fun to learn and all the information about staging made everything so much easier and manageable for me. The CD and translation were so useful too.”

Cendrillon is one of the 10 plays in Fun French Fairy Tale Plays, which contains specially written adaptations of well-known stories. Each story is given a special twist, adding extra humour. For example, Rapunzel lives at the top of the Eiffel Tower and Snow White loves to play sports, especially golf!

The plays provide an ideal way of motivating children in Key Stage 2 and 3 to learn French. Pupils will enjoy the challenge of learning a French script and subsequently gain confidence through performing it to an audience of adults and/or fellow pupils.

The plays use simple repetitive language and are easily adaptable. Each play has a specific language focus, making it easy to link the plays to topics the pupils are studying.

The book contains reproducible scripts, English translations and suggestions for performing the plays. The CD-Rom included with the book contains audio files of native French speakers performing the plays as well as a pdf version of the book.

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Filed under French, Key Stage 2, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)

New secondary foreign languages catalogue!

Do you teach French, Spanish or German at Key Stage 3? If so, you should have a look at our new secondary foreign languages catalogue. We’ve got lots of practical resources to make your life easier.

Brilliant Publications - Secondary Modern Foreign Languages Catalogue

Secondary Modern Foreign Languages Catalogue

 

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Filed under French, German, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), Spanish

Getting to Grips with French Grammar in Primary Schools

The Key Stage 2 Programme of Study for Languages states that primary school pupils should be taught to ‘understand basic grammar appropriate to the language being studied.’

9781783172825 Getting to Grips with French Grammar at Key Stage 2 Brilliant Publications

Getting to Grips with French Grammar at Key Stage 2

But it doesn’t give much specifics in terms of what grammar should be taught, to what level, and, crucially, how to ensure progression across all four years of Key Stage 2.

This is why Lara Townsend and Tracy Davies have written Getting to Grips with French Grammar at Key Stage 2.

Getting to Grips with French Grammar at Key Stage 2 breaks the French language into the key elements of gender, verbs and sentence buiding and forming questions, and provides a model of progression for each one.

Detailed assessment activities demonstrate how grammar can be assessed within a variety of contexts, alongside other aspects for the Language Programme of Study.

For more information and to see sample pages, visit our website. Alternatively, you can contact us by phone on 01449 766629 or by email at orders@tradecounter.co.uk.

You can order Getting to Grips with French Grammar on our website either in PDF for £10.99 or as a hardcopy book for £15.99. There is also the option to buy both the hardcopy and PDF together at a discounted price of £19.29.

 

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Filed under French, Key Stage 2, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)