Category Archives: Citizenship

Get talking about bullying

get talking about bullying

Use this free resource to develop your childrens’ spoken language skills by highlighting a topic they will have been hearing about this week.

‘Some people suggest it is best to give in and do what the bully wants. But that won’t stop the bullying. You shouldn’t just put up with it. You should always report bullying.’

‘Bullies often say that their victims deserve to be bullied. But no one deserves to be bullied.’

After reading some thoughts like these about bullying the children are presented with 10 statements to make them think about the article more deeply. They are then encouraged to discuss their own views on the statements.

Download your free resource Discussing an issue: Bullying to increase the impact of anti-bullying week and get your pupils speaking AND listening.

The resource is taken from Brilliant Activities for Speaking and Listening KS2, a book of activities designed to develop the spoken language skills of children in Years 3–6. The activities provide full coverage of the National Curriculum requirements for spoken language. The pupil assessment sheets and advice on progress ensure that schools can develop competence in this vital area of the curriculum.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, English, Key Stage, Key Stage 2, National Curriculum, Primary school, PSHE, Teaching Ideas

A story about jealousy for anti-bullying week

Katherine’s Story

How do people react to others’ successes? Some people are pleased for others; others are jealous – in their mind, the success that they see others enjoying, should be theirs.

Download your free copy of ‘Katherine’s Story’ to find out if Katherine finds the courage to be Head Girl after some jealous pupils are nasty to her.

This story is taken from Modern Christian Assembly Stories, a contemporary collection of 50 school stories all having a Christian theme.

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE, Religious education (RE), Teaching Ideas

Say No to Bullying

It’s easy to get your free assembly story, The Witness, for anti-bullying week!

‘Ranpresh is terrified of ‘The Gang’ and gets attacked on the way home from school. Hannah is a witness but she is afraid to do anything about it. At last she finds the courage to be part of the solution rather than being part of the problem.’

Download your free copy of ‘The Witness’ to find out what happens to Ranpresh and Hannah.

This story is taken from More Brilliant Stories for Assemblies, a collection of over 50 stories for use in primary schools. The stories range from those dealing with specific issues, such as bullying, racism and disability, to historical and religious stories.

The stories can be used at specific times of the year, when issues arise or whenever you are suddenly called upon to do an assembly!

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE, Teaching Ideas

Bullying

Free assembly story for anti-bullying week

‘Sometimes Tom kicked, hit or pinched him. Nobody ever saw it happen. It was always in school.’

Download your free copy of the story, ‘Bullying’, to find out what happens to Tom.

The story is taken from Brilliant Stories for Assemblies which contains over 60 stories for 7-11 year olds written by Paul Urry, an experienced primary school teacher and natural storyteller.

Whether you are suddenly called upon to take an assembly or wish to engage pupils in cultural, moral, religious or historical stories at your leisure, this book has them all.

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE

Bernard stops the bullies

Free assembly story for anti-bullying week

‘Bernard was beginning to realise that being interested in unusual things was not without its problems. Although his friends seemed to think he was interesting and fun to be with, there were others who used Bernard’s unusual habits to be unkind to him.’

Download your free copy of the story, ‘Bernard Stops the Bullies’, to find out what happens to Bernard and how he stops the bullies.

This assembly is from the collection 50 Fantastic Assembly Stories which are all set in Mill Lane Junior School, a fictional school. Children will enjoy getting to know the pupils and staff at Mill Lane and will relate to the moral dilemmas the characters face.

Children will relate to the main characters in the stories as they are the same age as they are, play with the things they play with and are going through the same daily challenges as they are going through. As a result, children will be interested to find out what the characters do in different situations, whether it is confronting a bully, or admitting that they have made a mistake.

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 2, PSHE

How many of your pupils will keep their faith?

 It is unlikely that reading ancient religious scriptures to your pupils will result in them forming a lifelong relationship with religion. But this might.

It could be argued that the reason for young people of today being less religious than their forefathers is because there is an increasing disconnect between the context of ancient religious scriptures and modern-day society. And in no place can we find better examples of this disconnect than in the Bible.

However, many religious people would argue that whilst this might be the case, the messages and teachings of these ancient religious scriptures still remain as relevant as ever, which is why Modern Christian Assembly Stories exists.

Modern Christian Assembly Stories gives schools an opportunity to teach children about the messages and teachings of the bible in a context which is relevant to pupils’ everyday lives, thus increasing the chances of young people choosing to maintain a lifelong relationship with the religion.

This valuable resource contains 50 assembly stories which not only link to Christianity, but also to a whole host of themes and situations that young people may encounter and find difficult to navigate, such as Bullying, Disability, Disappointment, Equal Opportunities, Divorce, Peer Pressure, Phobias and Friendships, to name a few.

Click here to see an overview of the contents of this resource

Click here to see a sample assembly story (Scott’s Story: Tackling Child Mental Health)

For more information or to order Modern Christian Assembly Stories for £18.50 as a printed book, £12.99 as an e-book or both for a discounted price of £22.40, simply visit:

https://www.brilliantpublications.co.uk/book/modern-christian-assembly-stories-710

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, PSHE, Religious education (RE)

How can we talk about terrorism without being frightening or bland?

Security is now, of course, everywhere. Even at the London Book Fair (not necessarily somewhere that you might expect to be targeted by terrorists), policemen with sniffer dogs now patrol the aisles between the stands.

And indeed, by chance, at the last London Book Fair one of the officers stopped by our stand and saw the book aimed at primary school teachers, “Talking about Terrorism”.

His reaction on seeing the book (and I must stress he spoke in a perfectly reasonable way) was “I have an eight year old daughter. I wouldn’t want her teachers teaching her about terrorism.”

And of course that’s a valid point. Just as parents want to monitor and restrict what their children see on TV and on the internet, so you as teachers don’t want them to learn about the harsh realities of the world around us, at least not too soon.

But the terror is real, and one way or another eight year olds will hear about the latest incident, just as adults do. Which means that somehow, as teachers, you need to be able to respond.

Plus you need to know how to respond to some of the suggestions made in relation to terrorism – for example, that events from British history could be classified as terrorism even though they are not normally called that.

These, and many other issues, are extremely difficult to resolve – but I do feel that they need to be considered and presented to children, because if they are not these same children will be getting information and ideas from elsewhere.

And that information may not be nearly as balanced as the information and thoughts that you, as teachers, could provide, even when the subject matter is incredibly challenging.

Which is why we have published “Talking about Terrorism”, the book the police officer saw on our stand.

It is a book which, if you are uncertain about how you should be answering the questions of primary school children concerning terrorism, you may care to look at.  For the book aims to help you formulate your own answers to the questions that children ask.

For more information or to order Talking About Terrorism for just £19.99 as a printed book, £13.99 as an e-book or both for a discounted price of £24.19, visit https://www.brilliantpublications.co.uk/book/talking-about-terrorism-740

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 2, Radicalisation and Terrorism, Teaching Ideas