Category Archives: Key Stage

Get talking about bullying

get talking about bullying

Use this free resource to develop your childrens’ spoken language skills by highlighting a topic they will have been hearing about this week.

‘Some people suggest it is best to give in and do what the bully wants. But that won’t stop the bullying. You shouldn’t just put up with it. You should always report bullying.’

‘Bullies often say that their victims deserve to be bullied. But no one deserves to be bullied.’

After reading some thoughts like these about bullying the children are presented with 10 statements to make them think about the article more deeply. They are then encouraged to discuss their own views on the statements.

Download your free resource Discussing an issue: Bullying to increase the impact of anti-bullying week and get your pupils speaking AND listening.

The resource is taken from Brilliant Activities for Speaking and Listening KS2, a book of activities designed to develop the spoken language skills of children in Years 3–6. The activities provide full coverage of the National Curriculum requirements for spoken language. The pupil assessment sheets and advice on progress ensure that schools can develop competence in this vital area of the curriculum.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, English, Key Stage, Key Stage 2, National Curriculum, Primary school, PSHE, Teaching Ideas

A story about jealousy for anti-bullying week

Katherine’s Story

How do people react to others’ successes? Some people are pleased for others; others are jealous – in their mind, the success that they see others enjoying, should be theirs.

Download your free copy of ‘Katherine’s Story’ to find out if Katherine finds the courage to be Head Girl after some jealous pupils are nasty to her.

This story is taken from Modern Christian Assembly Stories, a contemporary collection of 50 school stories all having a Christian theme.

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE, Religious education (RE), Teaching Ideas

Say No to Bullying

It’s easy to get your free assembly story, The Witness, for anti-bullying week!

‘Ranpresh is terrified of ‘The Gang’ and gets attacked on the way home from school. Hannah is a witness but she is afraid to do anything about it. At last she finds the courage to be part of the solution rather than being part of the problem.’

Download your free copy of ‘The Witness’ to find out what happens to Ranpresh and Hannah.

This story is taken from More Brilliant Stories for Assemblies, a collection of over 50 stories for use in primary schools. The stories range from those dealing with specific issues, such as bullying, racism and disability, to historical and religious stories.

The stories can be used at specific times of the year, when issues arise or whenever you are suddenly called upon to do an assembly!

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE, Teaching Ideas

Bullying

Free assembly story for anti-bullying week

‘Sometimes Tom kicked, hit or pinched him. Nobody ever saw it happen. It was always in school.’

Download your free copy of the story, ‘Bullying’, to find out what happens to Tom.

The story is taken from Brilliant Stories for Assemblies which contains over 60 stories for 7-11 year olds written by Paul Urry, an experienced primary school teacher and natural storyteller.

Whether you are suddenly called upon to take an assembly or wish to engage pupils in cultural, moral, religious or historical stories at your leisure, this book has them all.

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE

Bernard stops the bullies

Free assembly story for anti-bullying week

‘Bernard was beginning to realise that being interested in unusual things was not without its problems. Although his friends seemed to think he was interesting and fun to be with, there were others who used Bernard’s unusual habits to be unkind to him.’

Download your free copy of the story, ‘Bernard Stops the Bullies’, to find out what happens to Bernard and how he stops the bullies.

This assembly is from the collection 50 Fantastic Assembly Stories which are all set in Mill Lane Junior School, a fictional school. Children will enjoy getting to know the pupils and staff at Mill Lane and will relate to the moral dilemmas the characters face.

Children will relate to the main characters in the stories as they are the same age as they are, play with the things they play with and are going through the same daily challenges as they are going through. As a result, children will be interested to find out what the characters do in different situations, whether it is confronting a bully, or admitting that they have made a mistake.

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 2, PSHE

How does work, work, these days?

Increasingly children and those in the world of work have stopped thinking in straight lines

Straight-line thinking is what shop assistants used to use, in the days when we had shop assistants and, come to that, shops.  You could walk into a shop and look around wondering where a particular product was, and the shop assistant would say, “Can I help you?”

I actually tried that yesterday, wanting to buy a rucksack for an 18 mile walk I had signed up to, for reasons that will most certainly not become clear at this point.

But unfortunately, the strategy failed. The three shop assistants inside the very well-known sports store did finally stop talking to each other.  One of them looked at me curiously, evidently bemused that I should be asking a question.  I persisted in my quest, and eventually he said “upstairs” before picking up his mobile phone which had just pinged.

Old-fashioned straight-line thinking would have suggested he might accompany me and help me make the purchase, but no, that is far too passé for the modern world.

And the reason… well, management don’t train staff anymore, because ultimately, they’ll shut the shops and sell everything on-line where straight line thinking is irrelevant – as we can see each time we do a search on Google.  We get answers, certainly, but mostly not to the questions we ask.

So how do people who work in businesses and/or on-line actually think if not in straight lines?  The answer is that they think in the same way lots of contemporary novelists think. In multiple jumps and associations.

To see what I mean I would like, if I may, to direct you to a web page.  When you get there, print the page out (if you don’t you’ll end up standing on your head). 

Of course, children can’t make this leap to a new form of thinking instantly, so you might want to take it step by step by trying this page first of all.

We have produced three books of graphic organisers which start children on the journey towards developing the critical thinking skills needed in today’s contemporary world.

Doing this doesn’t mean that we don’t value logical linear thinking – of course that is still needed.  But in the modern world this alternative approach to problem-solving is becoming dominant, and that is what the “Graphic Organisers Pack” explores through a large series of graphics such as these.

Of course, not every modern organisation uses this non-linear thinking approach – many of them prefer a third option, which generally consists of everyone shouting at each other.  But personally I prefer a quieter life.

You can read more about how we can help children understand the new approach to thinking and planning which many young people, and those who run businesses, are adopting by looking here.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, How children learn, Key Stage 2, Primary school, Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND), Teaching Ideas

Practical Foundation Stage science and technology

What is the simplest way of organising and undertaking regular practical science and technology at Foundation Stage?

The answer must be to have available a multiplicity of activities in which the children can participate.

For it is only through participating in science and technology, while being guided by adults, that foundation stage pupils are able to have their curiosity stimulated while their knowledge of what science and technology are about grows at the same time.

In short, the doing of science and technology has to be the basis of learning, while the guidance and direction is also always present.

It is to answer this need to find multiple activities which give foundation pupils the chance actively to participate in science and technology, that we have published a new edition of Science and Technology for the Early Years (2nd edition).

And to show you exactly how we meet this aim of practical activities suitable for children at foundation level we have made an extract from the book available, completely free, on line.  

To see one complete project taken from “Science and Technology for the Early Years (2nd Edition)” please click here You will also be able to review the whole index of 100+ activities included in the book here.

This activity is one of over 100 science and technology sessions that can be undertaken in the classroom, which are explored in detail in the book.   Also provided in the book are multiple ideas for designing resource areas to stimulate purposeful play.

You can order Science and Technology for the Early Years (2nd Edition) on our website either as a PDF for £12.99 or as a hardcopy book for £18.50. There is also the option to buy the hardcopy and PDF together at a discounted price of £22.40.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Early years, Key Stage 0, Key Stage 1, lesson plans, Science, Teaching Ideas