Category Archives: Key Stage 3

10 great French memory tricks

Is this French verb masculine or feminine?

Try these tips for remembering whether a noun is feminine or masculine in French. Developing memory tricks, especially those that that paint a picture in your mind, is an ideal way of learning and remembering key  language points.

 

  1. Most feminine nouns end in an “e” and most masculine nouns don’t. Feminine nouns use “une” and masculine nouns use “un”.
  2. “Frère”, “père” and “grandpère” all end in an “e” but you can obviously only use “un”because they are masculine words.
  3. Even though “soeur” ends with a consonant you could obviously only use “une” with it because a sister is female.
  4. Traditionally flowers are given to women. That’s why “fleur” can only be feminine.
  5. Traditionally women didn’t go out to work and used to stay at home. That’s why “maison” can only be feminine.
  6. Think of women watching more television because they haven’t gone out to work. That’s why “télévision” is feminine. Also, the television is in the house and “maison” is feminine.
  7. “Une télévision” will also help you remember that other nouns that end in “ion”, such as “une question” and “une correction”, are also feminine.
  8. Remember that for many centuries education was reserved exclusively for men. They were the only ones allowed to open books. That’s why “livre” can only be masculine.
  9. Think of the important role of the telephone in business, traditionally a male domain. That’s why “téléphone” can only be masculine.
  10. Remember that it can only be acceptable for men to drink alcohol and it’s been proven that men can absorb more alcohol than women. That is why a glass, “un verre”, is masculine.
Unforgettable French - Brilliant Publications

Unforgettable French

These ideas have been taken from Unforgettable French written by Marie Rice-Jones. Unforgettable French can be used by anyone learning French grammar, from the basics up to GCSE level.

 

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Filed under French, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)

Talking to children about terrorism

In the attached podcast, Sima Kotecha from the BBC talks to teachers and students and  Elizabeth Garrett Anderson girls’ school in north London.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0390l46

The sentiments in the broadcast echo those of Alison Jamieson and Jane Flint in their book Radicalisation and Terrorism: A Teacher’s Handbook for Extremism.

Both the podcast and the book show that schools can play an important role through providing opportunities for discussion and debate.

As Alison Jamieson, an expert in terrorism, explains:

‘One can’t promise children that attacks will never happen again, but one can provide them with reliable and objective information.

It is important for children to understand what terrorists want: they want governments to over react, they want publicity or attention; they want to change behaviour; they want to stir up hatred between different groups of people. Terrorists don’t want us to stand together and feel united. Most of all they want to keep violence and hatred going.

Knowing that terrorism can and does end, as the examples of Northern Ireland and South Africa show, can help address some of the very real fears and concerns that children have today.’

 

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Filed under Key Stage 3, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism, Secondary school

Extreme measures

A thought-provoking article considering the Prevent strategy but also how to moderate classroom discussions on terrorism has been published in the latest Teach Secondary magazine.

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Filed under Key Stage 3, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism, Secondary school

Addressing Extremism in the Classroom

I’m delighted that an article by Alison Jamieson on the Prevent Duty: Addressing Extremism in the Classroom has just been published in Sec-Ed. Alison is co-author of Radicalisation and Terrorism: A Teacher’s Handbook for Addressing Extremism.

http://www.sec-ed.co.uk/best-practice/the-prevent-duty-addressing-extremism-in-the-classroom/

Radicalisation-Terrorism-cover

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Filed under Key Stage 3, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism, Secondary school

What do schools have to do to ensure they are abiding by the Counter Terrorism and Security Act?

Following the introduction of the new Counter Terrorism Act (which received its Royal Assent in February this year) it is a requirement for all schools to work in preventing young people from being drawn into terrorism.

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Filed under Key Stage 3, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism

Getting pupils to learn French is easy …

… it’s getting them to remember what they’ve learnt that’s the hard part!

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Filed under French, Key Stage, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, National Curriculum, Teaching Ideas

Counter-extremism lessons should be part of National Curriculum

Today on BBC Radio Four’s Today programme Dr Muhammed Tahir Al Qadri, a Pakistani politician and Islamic scholar, called for British Muslims to be taught ‘peace’ in school to tackle radicalisation.

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Filed under Citizenship, Key Stage 3, National Curriculum, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism