Category Archives: Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)

What’s the best way to introduce French vocabulary?

Flashcards are an excellent way of introducing primary school children to new French vocabulary. They are incredibly versatile and can be used in many different activities.

Furthermore, using flashcards promotes the use of the French as the meaning of the word will be obvious from the image, so there is no need to say the English equivalent.

While it is possible to make flashcards from images, either hand-drawn, cut out from magazines or found on-line, this is a time-consuming process.

To make your life easier, we have created packs of Mon Vocabulaire French flashcards. These time-saving resources are available as pdfs, so you can download and use them straight away.

9781554096800_Mon_Vocabulaire_Au-Zoo Brilliant Publications

Au Zoo – French flashcards and activities for At the zoo

9781554096794_Mon_Vocabulaire_A-La-Ferme Brilliant Publications

À la ferme – French flashcards and activities for At the farm

9781554096763_Mon_Vocabulaire_La-Maison Brilliant Publications

La maison – French flashcards and activities for the House

9781554096688_Mon_Vocabulaire_Animaux_domestiques Brilliant Publications

Les animaux domestiques – French flashcards and activities for Pets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The flashcards are available in 2 sizes. The large colour images are ideal for display on an Interactive Whiteboard. The smaller colour pictures can be easily printed out and made into flashcards for use by individuals or small groups.

We have Mon Vocabulaire packs for many popular French topics:

  • Les animaux domestiques
  • Comptons!
  • Les fruits et les legumes
  • Les forms géométriques
  • La maison
  • Les jours de la semaine
  • Les mois de l’année
  • Les parties du corps
  • À la ferme
  • Au zoo
  • Noël
  • Halloween
  • La Saint-Valentin
  • Pâques

In addition, with each pack you get reproducible activity sheets to reinforce the vocabulary:

  • Coloriez – Introduce new vocabulary
  • Associez les mots – Match the French word to the corresponding illustration
  • Illustrez les mots – Review vocabulary by drawing the image of the printed word
  • Écoutez les mots – Listen to the new words as students mark the corresponding word that the teacher reads aloud
  • Copiez les mots – Spell the new word by printing or writing
  • Mots cachés – Find the hidden words in the puzzle then match the word to the corresponding image
  • Décodez les motes – Match symbols to letter codes to decipher the word
  • Le bon ordre – Unscramble the letters to form the correct word
  • Mots croisés – Identify and spell the word for the corresponding image
  • Mots illustrés – Create a unique word picture
  • Le jeu – A two-player game that reinforces pronunciation and/or spelling of the new words
  • Le livre – Produce an illustrated short-story about the theme.

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Filed under French, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)

A dramatic approach to teaching French

9781783172450 Fun French Fairy Tale Plays Brilliant Publications

Fun French Fairy Tale Plays

Make a drama out of teaching French in the primary classroom

It is imperative that a diverse range of teaching and learning methods are used in the primary classroom, not least because one child will have a very different preferred learning style to the next. Yet there are very few French teaching resources that respond to the needs of kinaesthetic learners, which is why we have produced Fun French Fairy Tale Plays, written by Dot Hamilton.

These 10 specially written plays are adaptations of well-known stories; however each story is given a special twist to add humour. For example, Rapunzel lives at the top of the Eiffel Tower and Snow White loves to play sports, especially golf!

The plays provide an ideal way of motivating children aged 7–13 to learn French. Indeed, pupils will enjoy the challenge of learning a French script and will subsequently gain confidence through performing it to an audience of adults and/or their fellow pupils.

The plays use simple repetitive language and are easily adaptable. Each play has a specific language focus, making it easy to link the plays to topics that the pupils are studying.

The book contains reproducible scripts, English translations and suggestions for performing the plays, and the CD-Rom contains audio files of native French speakers performing the plays, as well as a pdf version of the book.

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Filed under French, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)

Decreasing dependency on Google translate

Or, to put it a different way « Diminution de la dépendance de Google traduit » (Note: actual Google translation of the blog title!)

Are you looking for a simple way of encouraging pupils to access the French vocabulary they need (without resorting to online translation packages)?

Mon Petit Vocabulaire - Brilliant Publications

Mon Petit Vocabulaire – mini French word book

Sample page from Mon Petit Vocabulaire - Brilliant Publications

Sample page from Mon Petit Vocabulaire

Primary children need to be able to access vocabulary to encourage them to speak, listen and write in French. But when they are just beginning to learn French, even the simplest bilingual French-English dictionaries can be overwhelming. It is understandable that some students feel the temptation to go online.

If you find this is the case, we have a solution for you. We publish Mon Petit Vocabulaire – mini (A6) books containing French vocabulary sheets for 33 popular primary school topics. Each page features 9-10 illustrations labelled with their French names. The booklets are colourful, fun to use  and support all French teaching schemes in use in primary schools.

Mon petit vocabulaire covers the following topics:

  • Salutations (Greetings)
  • Les nombres (Numbers 1 to 20)
  • Les nombres 20 à 100 (Numbers 20 to 100)
  • Les couleurs (Colours)
  • L’alphabet français (The French Alphabet)
  • Les jours de la semaine (Days of the Week)
  • Les mois (Months of the Year)
  • Les saisons (Seasons)
  • Noël (Christmas)
  • Les fruits (Fruits)
  • Les légumes (Vegetables)
  • Le restaurant (Restaurant)
  • Un pique-nique (Picnic)
  • Les boissons (Drinks)
  • Le temps (Weather)
  • Les vêtements (Clothes)
  • Les accessoires (Accessories)
  • Les parties du corps (Parts of the Body)
  • Ma famille (My Family)
  • Les animaux domestiques (Pets)
  • Les petites bêtes (Insects and Mini-beasts)
  • Les animaux sauvages (Wild Animals)
  • Les animaux de la ferme (Farm Animals)
  • Les animaux des bois (Woodland Animals)
  • Le système solaire (The Solar System)
  • Les objets de la classe (Classroom Objects)
  • Les matières (School Subjects)
  • Les sports – Je joue….. (Sports – I play…)
  • Les sports – Je fais ….. (Sports – I do ….)
  • Qu’est-ce que tu joues? Je joue … (Musical instruments – What do you play?)
  • Les formes (Shapes)
  • La France (Map of France)
  • Les Français célèbres (Famous French People)

Mon Petit Vocabulaire is available from Brilliant Publications in handy packs of 10 min-books.

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Filed under French, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)

A tried and test way of teaching French phonics

What more can be done to enhance your pupils’ learning of the French language?

Physical French Phonics - Brilliant Publications

Physical French Phonics

Some pupils find learning another language a particularly difficult task – partly because there is a whole new set of vocabulary to learn and remember, but also because English phonics cannot be applied to aid them with the pronunciation of this new vocabulary.

Thus a whole new phonics system must be learnt, which is why we have published Physical French Phonics – a tried and tested system for teaching French phonics which in 2012 was a European Language Label winning project.

Through using Physical French Phonics your pupils will not only learn how to correctly pronounce the French vocabulary that is introduced, but they will also gain the skills to tackle any new vocabulary they encounter with confidence.

How it works

For each phoneme, students learn an action, as well as the graphemes associated with that sound. Cheerful colourful cartoon pictures link the actions to the sounds and help to facilitate learning.

The DVD contains everything you need, from video clips of French speakers saying each sound and performing the associated action and audio clips of all the phonemes and words introduced, to attractive full-colour flashcards and resource sheets and interactive whiteboard files for all the phonemes.

Furthermore, the comprehensive teacher’s guide provides a clear step-by-step approach to introducing pupils to French phonemes. It contains practical advice, activities and guidance, along with photocopiable games and reference sheets.

You can find the complete list of Physical French Phonics’ resources by visiting this link. And to see a sample video from the DVD and a video showing children using the system, please do have a look at our Facebook page – www.facebook.com/physicalfrenchphonics.

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Filed under French, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)

10 great French memory tricks

Is this French verb masculine or feminine?

Try these tips for remembering whether a noun is feminine or masculine in French. Developing memory tricks, especially those that that paint a picture in your mind, is an ideal way of learning and remembering key  language points.

 

  1. Most feminine nouns end in an “e” and most masculine nouns don’t. Feminine nouns use “une” and masculine nouns use “un”.
  2. “Frère”, “père” and “grandpère” all end in an “e” but you can obviously only use “un”because they are masculine words.
  3. Even though “soeur” ends with a consonant you could obviously only use “une” with it because a sister is female.
  4. Traditionally flowers are given to women. That’s why “fleur” can only be feminine.
  5. Traditionally women didn’t go out to work and used to stay at home. That’s why “maison” can only be feminine.
  6. Think of women watching more television because they haven’t gone out to work. That’s why “télévision” is feminine. Also, the television is in the house and “maison” is feminine.
  7. “Une télévision” will also help you remember that other nouns that end in “ion”, such as “une question” and “une correction”, are also feminine.
  8. Remember that for many centuries education was reserved exclusively for men. They were the only ones allowed to open books. That’s why “livre” can only be masculine.
  9. Think of the important role of the telephone in business, traditionally a male domain. That’s why “téléphone” can only be masculine.
  10. Remember that it can only be acceptable for men to drink alcohol and it’s been proven that men can absorb more alcohol than women. That is why a glass, “un verre”, is masculine.
Unforgettable French - Brilliant Publications

Unforgettable French

These ideas have been taken from Unforgettable French written by Marie Rice-Jones. Unforgettable French can be used by anyone learning French grammar, from the basics up to GCSE level.

 

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Filed under French, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)

Brilliant new MFL resources

Our new MFL catalogue is now available! Click here to download your copy.

 

brilliant-primary-mfl-catalogue-2017

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), News

5 fun games for teaching a foreign language

Try these ideas for bringing some fun into your foreign language teaching. They can be adapted for use with almost any modern foreign language (MFL).

100+ Fun Ideas for Practising Modern Foreign Languages in the Primary Classroom - Brilliant Publications

100+ Fun Ideas for Practising Modern Foreign Languages in the Primary Classroom

  1. Fruit Salad
    • The children need to be sitting on chairs in a circle.
    • Give every child a word or phrase to remember, with each word allocated to more than one child.
    • Call out one of these and everyone responsible for it must get up and find a new seat.
    • Occasionally, call out ‘Fruit Salad’ and everyone must change places.
    • You could ask a child to stand in the centre of the circle and call out the words instead of you. This child should then try to take the place of one of the children who gets up. It is then the turn of this child to call out the words or phrases.
  1. Weather forecast
    • With a map as a reference, ask the children to pretend that they are on television and presenting a weather forecast.
    • Cut out weather shapes which can be moved around on the map to make it more authentic and interactive. This activity can also be done using an interactive whiteboard.
  1. Dressing up
    • If you are practising the words for clothes, try this fun game with willing children.
    • Provide two piles of clothes identical in type and colour.
    • Name an item of clothing and its colour.
    • A point goes to the team who correctly identifies and puts on the item of clothing first. This is guaranteed to have the children in fits of laughter.
  1. Fashion show
    • If your learners know the words for items of clothing and colours, ask the children to write a commentary for a fashion show and then perform it using dressing-up clothes.
    • They will have a lot of fun deciding which clothes to wear as they strut along the catwalk.
  1. On the phone
    • Try using two telephones and ask the children to sit back-to-back whilst holding a conversation. This makes the interaction more challenging, as there are no visual clues.
    • This is a particularly authentic setting for discussing the weather as normally you would never ask someone what the weather is like if you are in the same place.

For over 100 more fun ideas for teaching languages in primary schools get 100+ Fun Ideas for Practising Modern Foreign Languages in the Primary Classroom by Sue Cave, published by Brilliant Publications.

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Filed under Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), Primary school, Teaching Ideas