Category Archives: PSHE

How many of your pupils will keep their faith?

 It is unlikely that reading ancient religious scriptures to your pupils will result in them forming a lifelong relationship with religion. But this might.

It could be argued that the reason for young people of today being less religious than their forefathers is because there is an increasing disconnect between the context of ancient religious scriptures and modern-day society. And in no place can we find better examples of this disconnect than in the Bible.

However, many religious people would argue that whilst this might be the case, the messages and teachings of these ancient religious scriptures still remain as relevant as ever, which is why Modern Christian Assembly Stories exists.

Modern Christian Assembly Stories gives schools an opportunity to teach children about the messages and teachings of the bible in a context which is relevant to pupils’ everyday lives, thus increasing the chances of young people choosing to maintain a lifelong relationship with the religion.

This valuable resource contains 50 assembly stories which not only link to Christianity, but also to a whole host of themes and situations that young people may encounter and find difficult to navigate, such as Bullying, Disability, Disappointment, Equal Opportunities, Divorce, Peer Pressure, Phobias and Friendships, to name a few.

Click here to see an overview of the contents of this resource

Click here to see a sample assembly story (Scott’s Story: Tackling Child Mental Health)

For more information or to order Modern Christian Assembly Stories for £18.50 as a printed book, £12.99 as an e-book or both for a discounted price of £22.40, simply visit:

https://www.brilliantpublications.co.uk/book/modern-christian-assembly-stories-710

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, PSHE, Religious education (RE)

How can we talk about terrorism without being frightening or bland?

Security is now, of course, everywhere. Even at the London Book Fair (not necessarily somewhere that you might expect to be targeted by terrorists), policemen with sniffer dogs now patrol the aisles between the stands.

And indeed, by chance, at the last London Book Fair one of the officers stopped by our stand and saw the book aimed at primary school teachers, “Talking about Terrorism”.

His reaction on seeing the book (and I must stress he spoke in a perfectly reasonable way) was “I have an eight year old daughter. I wouldn’t want her teachers teaching her about terrorism.”

And of course that’s a valid point. Just as parents want to monitor and restrict what their children see on TV and on the internet, so you as teachers don’t want them to learn about the harsh realities of the world around us, at least not too soon.

But the terror is real, and one way or another eight year olds will hear about the latest incident, just as adults do. Which means that somehow, as teachers, you need to be able to respond.

Plus you need to know how to respond to some of the suggestions made in relation to terrorism – for example, that events from British history could be classified as terrorism even though they are not normally called that.

These, and many other issues, are extremely difficult to resolve – but I do feel that they need to be considered and presented to children, because if they are not these same children will be getting information and ideas from elsewhere.

And that information may not be nearly as balanced as the information and thoughts that you, as teachers, could provide, even when the subject matter is incredibly challenging.

Which is why we have published “Talking about Terrorism”, the book the police officer saw on our stand.

It is a book which, if you are uncertain about how you should be answering the questions of primary school children concerning terrorism, you may care to look at.  For the book aims to help you formulate your own answers to the questions that children ask.

For more information or to order Talking About Terrorism for just £19.99 as a printed book, £13.99 as an e-book or both for a discounted price of £24.19, visit https://www.brilliantpublications.co.uk/book/talking-about-terrorism-740

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 2, Radicalisation and Terrorism, Teaching Ideas

Have we really forgotten how to debate?

‘WE HAVE FORGOTTEN HOW TO DEBATE’ – DO YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE? Continue reading

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, PSHE, Secondary school

FREE worksheets for teaching values

What Qualities Do You Value?

9781783172030-Teaching-Values-Quality-pyramid-words Continue reading

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Primary school, PSHE, Secondary school

What is the most effective way to develop your children’s emotional intelligence?

 

It is vital that children develop their emotional intelligence, for this guides their thinking and behaviour. Yet emotional intelligence can be incredibly difficult to teach to children, which is why Brilliant Publications has produced 5 resources to help you. We don’t like singing our own praises, but they have been very well received by teachers.

 

The stories can be used at specific times of the year, or when issues arise, or whenever you are suddenly called upon to do an assembly.

59781783171026-50-Fantastic-Assembly-Stories-KS2[1]0 Fantastic Assembly Stories for KS2 are set in Mill Lane Junior School – a fictional school. Each provides a moral dilemma for the character(s) to consider or tackle. Your pupils will relate to the character and the character’s dilemma.

The author, Adrian Martin, has been a headteacher for many years. His pupils have loved getting to know the different characters at Mill Lane Junior School, and have remembered the stories long after they first heard them.

Find out more about this book

9781783172030-Teaching-Values-PSHE-Citizenship[1]Teaching Values through PSHE and Citizenship provides teachers with 38 activities for children aged 9 to 13 years old which promote the fundamental values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faith and beliefs.

The book is divided into three sections:

  • Beliefs, Values, Behaviour
  • Rules and Responsibilities
  • Respecting People’s Rights

Find out more about this book

 

9781783172283-Modern-Christian-Assemblies-temp2[1]

Modern Christian Assembly Stories is a collection of 50 contemporary stories written by Gary Nott who deploys the very best techniques of storytelling. Using modern situations and idioms, which are familiar to children, Gary communicates the wisdom found in Jesus’ parables, making the stories ideal for schools wishing to ensure that their collective worship is, in the main, Christian.

Find out more about this book

 

9781905780143-Brilliant-Class-led-Assemblies[1]Are you running out of ideas for assemblies? Brilliant Class-led Assemblies, will provide you with 10 easy-to-use, stress-free assemblies linked to the National Curriculum for science, history and geography. All these tried-and-tested assembly scripts can be easily modified to suit your class and can be as elaborate or as straightforward as you wish.

Your pupils can participate as narrators, evacuees, water droplets or investigators, even the River Nile! The assemblies are constructed so that all the class can be involved in some way. All can be introduced and done within one week.

Find out more about this book

9781905780747-More-Brilliant-Stories-Assembly[1]

More Brilliant Stories for Assemblies contains over 50 stories for use in primary schools. The stories range from those dealing with specific issues, such as bullying, falling out with friends, racism and disability, to historical and religious stories.

Find out more about this book

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sample material from each book is available on our website.  A link to an example is shown below:

Download a free activity about judging by appearance

These books are available in printed form and as an e-book which enables the pages to be displayed on an interactive whiteboard.

You can order these books in any of these ways:

 

 

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, PSHE, Religious education (RE)

Number of children worrying about war and terror rises sharply

According to a recent study by Childwise, one in three children aged 9-16 are concerned about global events. War and terrorism were the two main areas of concern. This is a notable increase from 2015, when it was just one in four children.

Brilliant Publications publishes two books to help teachers to respond to children’s questions about terrorism. Talking about Terrorism is for teachers of 7-11 year olds and Radicalisation and Terrorism is for teachers of 11-14 year olds.

Talking about Terrorism by Alison Jamieson and Jane Flint

Talking about Terrorism

Radicalisation and Terrorism by Alison Jamieson and Jane Flint

Radicalisation and Terrorism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More information on the Childwise study can be found in this Guardian article:

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jan/31/children-worrying-about-war-terror-rises-sharply-uk

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Filed under Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism

Top 10 tips for successful cooking lessons

Cooking in primary schools is easy when you follow these 10 tips taken from Teaching Healthy Cooking and Nutrition in Primary Schools. Not only do the books in this series contain delicious recipes, they also help you to teach children about healthy eating and nutrition – essential life skills.

9781783171132 Teaching Healthy Cooking and Nutrition in Primary Schools Brilliant Publications

Teaching Healthy Cooking and Nutrition in Primary Schools

  1. Remind children that an important aspect of learning to cook is learning to work together. This is especially important if they are working in pairs or groups. Being able to share and work together is an important cooking skill.
  2. If you are working with children of mixed abilities, use both illustrated and traditional format recipes. Give less able readers illustrated step-by-step recipes so they can keep up with their classmates. Make sure the two recipes follow the same steps so the class can still work together.
  3. Demonstrate recipes 2-3 steps at a time. Introduce safety points as you progress. For example – remind children that they must always lay knives down flat and away from the edge of the table, whilst you demonstrate chopping.
  4. Encourage children to gather around all the ingredients and equipment they need before starting. They could tick things off on a copy of the recipe.
  5. If you place recipes and other sheets in clear plastic wallets (or laminate them) they can be used again and again.
  6. Use low-fat options where possible to encourage healthy eating.
  7. Show children the ‘Eatwell Guide’ to explain what types of food you should eat to have a healthy and balanced diet. You should eat five portions of fruit and vegetables a day and eat very little fats, oils and sweets.
  8. Whilst cooking, explain related theory to children. For example – when learning how to open a tin, you could explain that tin cans preserve food because they are airtight which stops micro-organisms getting in and growing on the food.
  9. After completing several different recipes and mastering different skills children could be given a Certificate of Achievement to acknowledge the accomplishments, such as learning to chop, knead dough, core an apple etc.
  10.  Above all, have fun and enjoy cooking with children!

These ideas have been taken from the Teaching Healthy Cooking and Nutrition in Primary Schools series written by Sandra Mulvany. Each of the books contains twelve easy-to-follow photocopiable recipes, presented traditionally and in an illustrated step-by-step format.

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Filed under Healthy eating, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, PSHE