Category Archives: Secondary school

Dr Jekyll was a nice man, really …

There are two reactions when people know my job; I’ve started to wonder if I’m both Jekyll and Hyde, at the same time.

It is not so much that people ask me what I do, it is rather that when they hear what my job is, they make assumptions.

You see: I’m a publisher.  To some that makes me one of the good guys.  To others I’m evil incarnate.  Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in fact.  Both at the same time.

Dr Jekyll, the old friend, the nice guy, the one who helps people out; I publish books teachers quite like, and indeed, if you fancy writing a book, it is possible I can bring it to the attention of teachers all over the UK.

Edward Hyde, on the other hand, evil personified; he’ll probably take your book, eat it, and then set fire to your house.

Now, to explain….  I don’t think I am suffering from dissociative identity disorder (although on the other hand, if I am, how would I know?) which was the condition that Robert Louis Stephenson was told by others he was in fact writing about.

Stephenson later said he was so appalled at the idea that he was describing an actual medical condition rather than an allegory, he burned the original Jekyll and Hyde manuscript and started again.  (There’s no evidence for this, but it all adds to the book mystique; it was probably dreamed up by his publisher’s head of publicity.)

But no; when teachers send me books to consider for publication I do not burn them.  Not at all.  Never.  Not once.  Really.  Not at all.

No, my colleagues and I read the outlines and if we like the outline and think we could sell a fair number of copies, we ask to see the whole book.  Then if we still like it, we arrange for printing or creating an e-book.  Then we advertise it a lot, all at our own expense, and then we pay the author a fee for each book sold.

Edward Hyde, had he been a publisher, would, I suspect, have killed off each of his writers.  If you are worried about this you can look me up on the police database.  No charges for attempted murder of authors on file.

So that’s my point: we are the good guys – the Dr Jekyll without the propensity for assassinations or personality changing potions.

And indeed as the good guys we have even published a Graphic Revision Guide for The Strange Case of Dr J and Mr H, suitable for GCSE Literature students.

I’d recommend you have a look – although preferably without first dabbling with any strange potions.

And if you fancy writing a book for us, there are details of how to go about submitting it here.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, English, Key Stage 4, National Curriculum, Secondary school

Have we really forgotten how to debate?

‘WE HAVE FORGOTTEN HOW TO DEBATE’ – DO YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE? Continue reading

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, PSHE, Secondary school

How do I get 20% discount on an order?

Simple, let us have comments and feedback on our resources!

We recently promoted our 12 Petites Pièces à Jouer resource.

9781905780778-12-Petites-Pieces-a-Jouer

One of our customers responded …

‘We already use this book at school and it is brilliant! I would recommend it to any Primary school who offers French!’ (Foreign Language Teacher at an Independent School in London which has been awarded ‘School of the Week’ by School House Magazine.)

In return we sent a 20% discount code for use on our website as a thank you.

How easy is that?

Send your comments to: info@brilliantpublications.co.uk

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, French, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), Primary school, Secondary school

FREE worksheets for teaching values

What Qualities Do You Value?

9781783172030-Teaching-Values-Quality-pyramid-words Continue reading

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Primary school, PSHE, Secondary school

Talking to children about terrorism

In the attached podcast, Sima Kotecha from the BBC talks to teachers and students and  Elizabeth Garrett Anderson girls’ school in north London.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0390l46

The sentiments in the broadcast echo those of Alison Jamieson and Jane Flint in their book Radicalisation and Terrorism: A Teacher’s Handbook for Extremism.

Both the podcast and the book show that schools can play an important role through providing opportunities for discussion and debate.

As Alison Jamieson, an expert in terrorism, explains:

‘One can’t promise children that attacks will never happen again, but one can provide them with reliable and objective information.

It is important for children to understand what terrorists want: they want governments to over react, they want publicity or attention; they want to change behaviour; they want to stir up hatred between different groups of people. Terrorists don’t want us to stand together and feel united. Most of all they want to keep violence and hatred going.

Knowing that terrorism can and does end, as the examples of Northern Ireland and South Africa show, can help address some of the very real fears and concerns that children have today.’

 

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Filed under Key Stage 3, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism, Secondary school

Extreme measures

A thought-provoking article considering the Prevent strategy but also how to moderate classroom discussions on terrorism has been published in the latest Teach Secondary magazine.

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Filed under Key Stage 3, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism, Secondary school

Addressing Extremism in the Classroom

I’m delighted that an article by Alison Jamieson on the Prevent Duty: Addressing Extremism in the Classroom has just been published in Sec-Ed. Alison is co-author of Radicalisation and Terrorism: A Teacher’s Handbook for Addressing Extremism.

http://www.sec-ed.co.uk/best-practice/the-prevent-duty-addressing-extremism-in-the-classroom/

Radicalisation-Terrorism-cover

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Filed under Key Stage 3, PSHE, Radicalisation and Terrorism, Secondary school