Dr Jekyll was a nice man, really …

There are two reactions when people know my job; I’ve started to wonder if I’m both Jekyll and Hyde, at the same time.

It is not so much that people ask me what I do, it is rather that when they hear what my job is, they make assumptions.

You see: I’m a publisher.  To some that makes me one of the good guys.  To others I’m evil incarnate.  Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in fact.  Both at the same time.

Dr Jekyll, the old friend, the nice guy, the one who helps people out; I publish books teachers quite like, and indeed, if you fancy writing a book, it is possible I can bring it to the attention of teachers all over the UK.

Edward Hyde, on the other hand, evil personified; he’ll probably take your book, eat it, and then set fire to your house.

Now, to explain….  I don’t think I am suffering from dissociative identity disorder (although on the other hand, if I am, how would I know?) which was the condition that Robert Louis Stephenson was told by others he was in fact writing about.

Stephenson later said he was so appalled at the idea that he was describing an actual medical condition rather than an allegory, he burned the original Jekyll and Hyde manuscript and started again.  (There’s no evidence for this, but it all adds to the book mystique; it was probably dreamed up by his publisher’s head of publicity.)

But no; when teachers send me books to consider for publication I do not burn them.  Not at all.  Never.  Not once.  Really.  Not at all.

No, my colleagues and I read the outlines and if we like the outline and think we could sell a fair number of copies, we ask to see the whole book.  Then if we still like it, we arrange for printing or creating an e-book.  Then we advertise it a lot, all at our own expense, and then we pay the author a fee for each book sold.

Edward Hyde, had he been a publisher, would, I suspect, have killed off each of his writers.  If you are worried about this you can look me up on the police database.  No charges for attempted murder of authors on file.

So that’s my point: we are the good guys – the Dr Jekyll without the propensity for assassinations or personality changing potions.

And indeed as the good guys we have even published a Graphic Revision Guide for The Strange Case of Dr J and Mr H, suitable for GCSE Literature students.

I’d recommend you have a look – although preferably without first dabbling with any strange potions.

And if you fancy writing a book for us, there are details of how to go about submitting it here.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, English, Key Stage 4, National Curriculum, Secondary school

Who needs Lesson Plans for Painting in Primary Classes?

Painting is a Class Act

Teaching painting can be daunting for the non-specialist. This set of three books ( for ages 5-7, ages 7-9 and ages 9-11) takes the hard work out of planning art activities. The books set out the progression of skills to be taught for colour mixing, colour theory, composition and using watercolours and other media. They use works of art to provide examples of how skills can be applied.

Painting is a Class Act is aimed specifically at non-specialist art teachers, but more experienced art teachers will find it inspirational too. It contains carefully planned, clearly laid-out lesson plans which Introduce pupils to the skills of painting and which use the work of great artists and of children  as examples.

Painting is a Class Act:

  • Provides a structured, skills-based approach to developing painting skills
  • Helps pupils develop a knowledge and feel for paints and colours
  • Provides pupils with a way to express their ideas and feelings – confidence and pride will ensue.

You can order Painting is a Class Act: in any of these ways:

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Filed under Art and design, Brilliant Publications, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, lesson plans, Primary school, Teaching Ideas

Could these Graphic Revision Guides make English Literature accessible to your dyslexic students?

English literature in itself is not about reading, but rather it is about forming a deeper understanding of a novel and being able to make connections and judgements based on this understanding. But how can one form an understanding of a novel without reading it? The answer lies with Graphic Revision Guides.

Brilliant Publications has produced Graphic Revision Guides for a number of texts studied at GCSE English Literature, including: Jane Eyre, Jekyll and Hyde, Pride and Prejudice and Great Expectations. The Graphic Revision Guides contain comic-style sheets, especially tailored to strengthen the student’s understanding of plot, characters, quotes, themes, and more.

Learning and revising these iconic novels will become an easier and more enjoyable experience, not least because there is less text for your students to muddle through. It should be noted however that the Graphic Revision Guides do still contain some text, so they may not be suitable for students with acute dyslexia – visit the links above to see sample pages and have a look for yourself.

You can order any of the above Graphic Revision Guides for £16.50 as a printed book, £10.99 as an e-book or both for a discounted price of £19.80.

There is a discount of 20% if you wish to order class sets of 20 or more.

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What is one of the best ways to give children the confidence to speak French?

Singing songs is a fun way of helping children to develop an enthusiasm for French. The 20 songs in ‘J’aime Beaucoup Chanter en Français!’ are set to familiar tunes, so you and the children can concentrate on the words without having to learn new tunes. You will all soon be confidently singing in French!

The songs introduce and reinforce vocabulary for many frequently taught topics. Sing about different modes of transport to, appropriately enough, the tune of ‘The Wheels on the Bus’ or explore the contents of a pencil case to the tune of ‘Frère Jacques’.

The songs are ideal for use with children through all stages of their primary education but especially Key Stage 2.

The CD-Rom contains recordings of all the songs, sung by native French speakers, as well as music tracks to enable ‘karaoke’ performances and colour versions of the flashcards from the book.

The accompanying book contains words to all the songs, together with English translations, as well as teaching ideas and attractive photocopiable flashcards to help children understand the content of the songs.

Visit our website for more information and sample material on  J’aime Beaucoup Chanter en Français!

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Have we really forgotten how to debate?

‘WE HAVE FORGOTTEN HOW TO DEBATE’ – DO YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE? Continue reading

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, PSHE, Secondary school

How do I get 20% discount on an order?

Simple, let us have comments and feedback on our resources!

We recently promoted our 12 Petites Pièces à Jouer resource.

9781905780778-12-Petites-Pieces-a-Jouer

One of our customers responded …

‘We already use this book at school and it is brilliant! I would recommend it to any Primary school who offers French!’ (Foreign Language Teacher at an Independent School in London which has been awarded ‘School of the Week’ by School House Magazine.)

In return we sent a 20% discount code for use on our website as a thank you.

How easy is that?

Send your comments to: info@brilliantpublications.co.uk

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, French, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), Primary school, Secondary school

Get your pupils writing French phrases!

The KS2 Programme of Study for foreign languages provides a skeleton outline of what needs to be taught at KS2. This is great if you are a language specialist Continue reading

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, French, Key Stage 2, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), Primary school