Tag Archives: English resources

5 reasons why you should look at our new best seller catalogue!

1.      Our brilliant books are written by brilliant teachers. They know what will inspire, motivate and challenge pupils and keep them engaged in their learning.

2.      Our easy to use resources help teachers to plan and deliver stress-free lessons across the curriculum. They are designed to supplement existing schemes, giving extra support to dip into as required.

3.      Our best-selling titles are linked to the National Curriculum programmes of study. Subjects covered include English and maths as well as foundation subjects such as foreign languages, PE and art.

4.      Our resources are flexible and can be adapted to suit a range of situations, whether this is children sitting in rows, limited sharing of equipment or even unexpected school closures. Our reproducible worksheets are ideal both for individual work in the classroom and for inclusion in home-learning packs.

5.      As an added bonus, you can save 20% on any orders you place, simply by quoting discount code C2020.

When you place an order, don’t forget to use the 20% discount code C2020 at the checkout. The code is valid until 31st October 2020 and excludes p&p. You can order via our secure website: www.brilliantpublications.co.uk, by email (orders@tradecounter.co.uk), by ‘phone (01449 766629) or by fax (01449 767122).

Brilliant Publications Best Sellers catalogue 2020

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Filed under Art and design, Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Early years, English, French, German, Gifted and Talented, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Mathematics, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), Nursery and Preschool, Physical Education (PE), Primary school, PSHE, Religious education (RE), Science, Spanish, Teaching Ideas

How do you create drama with a sentence?

What is the most effective way of helping your pupils create varied, grammatically correct, sentences that convey moods?

Her heart pounded!

To write a gripping story you need variety – variety of tone, vocabulary, and sentence structure.

She gulped in fear as she continued her never ending trail.

As a primary school teacher of more than 21 years, Alec Lees has identified 8 different sentence structures that can be taught in 15 minutes a day across a half term.

The rather frightened girl saw a dark figure, who was holding something in his dark, cold, hand.

As each sentence builds on the previous one from simple sentences with just one verb to complex, compound sentences – pupils gain lots of practice in using clauses, conjunctions, lengths of sentence, and punctuation. Using sentence structures helps pupils develop their grammar skills with confidence, whatever their ability.

As the girl panicked, she heard a drip, drip, drip behind her.

By giving pupils the power to construct sentences they know convey shock, surprise, suspense (to name a few emotions), they are able to create paragraphs that really tell a story.

Running, she heard a twig snap. 

More importantly, pupils are confident that when they share their story, their audience will find it gripping as they have used a variety of sentence types to build atmosphere.

What was that noise – she thought to herself? 

We have helped Alec by publishing all his tried and tested ideas in the book Daily Sentence Structures. Written as a practical guide, this book provides a straightforward way of teaching pupils to use a range of sentence structures in their own writing, whatever their ability.

You could tell she was scared because tears and sweat poured down her face.

Her heart pounded – something touched her, but it was too late …

 You can try out a simple sentence taster with your pupils by using these sheets.

Drama provided by Sanaa (Year 6); method provided by Daily Sentence Structures.

You can read more about Daily Sentence Structures on our website and The Daily Sentence Structures book can be ordered either as a PDF for £12.99 or as a printed book for £18.50.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, English, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, lesson plans, Primary school, Teaching Ideas

FREE Creative Homework Tasks for Year 5 and Year 6

Follow this link to get a FREE 84-page e-book, Creative Homework Tasks for 9-11 Year Olds.

The activities are ideal for English or maths homework as they reinforce literacy and numeracy skills. The tasks link to other subject areas including science and technology, art and design and PSHE

But more than that, the imaginative, open-ended activities are sure to spark enthusiasm.

The tasks have been designed so that they can be given out with little or no input from the teacher if need be.

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Filed under Art and design, Brilliant Publications, English, homework, Key Stage 2, Mathematics, Primary school, PSHE, Science, Teaching Ideas

FREE Creative Homework Tasks

Follow this link to get a FREE 84-page e-book, Creative Homework Tasks for 7-9 Year Olds.

The activities are ideal for English or maths homework as they reinforce literacy and numeracy skills. The tasks link to other subject areas including science and technology, art and design and PSHE

But more than that, the imaginative, open-ended activities are sure to spark enthusiasm.

The tasks have been designed so that they can be given out with little or no input from the teacher if need be.

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Filed under Art and design, Brilliant Publications, English, homework, Key Stage 2, Mathematics, PSHE, Science, Teaching Ideas

How does work, work, these days?

Increasingly children and those in the world of work have stopped thinking in straight lines

Straight-line thinking is what shop assistants used to use, in the days when we had shop assistants and, come to that, shops.  You could walk into a shop and look around wondering where a particular product was, and the shop assistant would say, “Can I help you?”

I actually tried that yesterday, wanting to buy a rucksack for an 18 mile walk I had signed up to, for reasons that will most certainly not become clear at this point.

But unfortunately, the strategy failed. The three shop assistants inside the very well-known sports store did finally stop talking to each other.  One of them looked at me curiously, evidently bemused that I should be asking a question.  I persisted in my quest, and eventually he said “upstairs” before picking up his mobile phone which had just pinged.

Old-fashioned straight-line thinking would have suggested he might accompany me and help me make the purchase, but no, that is far too passé for the modern world.

And the reason… well, management don’t train staff anymore, because ultimately, they’ll shut the shops and sell everything on-line where straight line thinking is irrelevant – as we can see each time we do a search on Google.  We get answers, certainly, but mostly not to the questions we ask.

So how do people who work in businesses and/or on-line actually think if not in straight lines?  The answer is that they think in the same way lots of contemporary novelists think. In multiple jumps and associations.

To see what I mean I would like, if I may, to direct you to a web page.  When you get there, print the page out (if you don’t you’ll end up standing on your head). 

Of course, children can’t make this leap to a new form of thinking instantly, so you might want to take it step by step by trying this page first of all.

We have produced three books of graphic organisers which start children on the journey towards developing the critical thinking skills needed in today’s contemporary world.

Doing this doesn’t mean that we don’t value logical linear thinking – of course that is still needed.  But in the modern world this alternative approach to problem-solving is becoming dominant, and that is what the “Graphic Organisers Pack” explores through a large series of graphics such as these.

Of course, not every modern organisation uses this non-linear thinking approach – many of them prefer a third option, which generally consists of everyone shouting at each other.  But personally I prefer a quieter life.

You can read more about how we can help children understand the new approach to thinking and planning which many young people, and those who run businesses, are adopting by looking here.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, How children learn, Key Stage 2, Primary school, Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND), Teaching Ideas