Tag Archives: mathematics

Can you learn maths by playing card games?

We asked some children what they thought of Deck Ahoy. Here are just a few of the things they had to say:

Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications maths with a deck of cards Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications maths with a deck of cards Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications maths with a deck of cards“Deck Ahoy is much better than watching TV and cartoon shows because it shows different ways of how to do maths.” Angelica, age 8

“I like Deck Ahoy because it helps me with my maths and number bonds to 10 and 100. It can help you with your maths a lot.” Hadi, age 11

“I like Deck Ahoy because it helps me to learn maths and it helps me to add and subtract.” Sasha, age 8

“I can now partitiion and double 2-digit numbers.” Hersi

“I like Deck Ahoy because it helps me with maths and it’s so much fun!” Bilal, age 8

“It’s easy to learn time with Deck Ahoy.” Abed, age 7

“Deck Ahoy is fun and it is easy to learn maths.” Naomi, age 7

“Deck Ahoy will help everyone with maths and fractions. It’s awesome!” Cameron, age 10

“Deck Ahoy is very fun because every day I learn new stuff.” Ashley, age 7

Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications maths with a deck of cards“I like Deck Ahoy because it’s fun and it helps us to do our maths.” Charlotte, age 9

“Deck Ahoy is very fun and you can learn from it.” Gilbert, age 10

Deck Ahoy Brilliant Publications 9781783171781

Deck Ahoy: Primary Mathematics Activities and Games Using Just a Deck of Cards

Deck Ahoy contains over 100 activities and games to teach primary maths skills with a just deck of cards – no need to buy expensive resources!

Deck Ahoy covers not only the main operations – addition, subtraction, multiplication and division – but also fractions, statistics, time, ratios, squares and cubes and graphs.

The ideas are great for homework as there are no worksheets needed (or marking to do!) and the whole family can get involved, any where, any time.

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Filed under Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Mathematics, Uncategorised

Do your maths lessons need a superhero (or two)?

The Mighty Fun Activities for Practising Times Tables series uses superheroes to motivate primary school children to practise all the skills needed to solve multiplication, division and word-based times table problems. Superheroes appeal to even the most reluctant of learners and instil a positive and competitive attitude towards learning. Your pupils will be eager and motivated to want to learn and practise their times tables.

Mighty Fun Activities for Practising Times Tables, Book 3 - Brilliant Publications

Mighty Fun Activities for Practising Times Tables, Book 3

Mighty Fun Activities for Practising Times Tables, Book 2 - Brilliant Publications

Mighty Fun Activities for Practising Times Tables, Book 2

Mighty Fun Activities for Practising Times Tables, Book 1 - Brilliant Publications

Mighty Fun Activities for Practising Times Tables, Book 1

There are three books in the Mighty Fun Activities for Practising Times Tables series:
Book 1: 2, 5 and 10 times tables
Book 2: 3, 4, 6 and 8 times tables
Book 3: 7, 9, 11 and 12 times tables

The books contain reproducible sheets and are designed to be used as flexible teaching aids, which teachers can dip in and out of in any order to support the learning of any times table. They work equally well as stand alone 5 to 20 minute lesson reinforcements or as regular times table learning.

We recognise that all children learn in different ways and that they need to have opportunities to apply their knowledge and skills. For each times table there is a mixture of practical activities to develop their understanding and written activities to consolidate their knowledge.

The mixed times table sheets at the back of the book allow children to apply the skills gained in learning individual tables, working out for themselves which multiple facts and methods they need to use.

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Filed under Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Mathematics

Finger tracing helps to solve maths problems

According to a research project published in the Journal of Applied Cognitive Psychology,  tracing over mathmatical problems with one’s finger helps develop mathematical understanding.

Tracing can help when learning not only spatial topics such as shapes and angle relationships, but also for non-spatial tasks such as learning the order of tasks in arithmetic problems.

For instance, pupils who traced over the addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and brackets symbols in problems such as 7 x (31 – 20) + 56 ÷ (5 – 3) = ? solved more problems correctly on a subsequent test.

The study also found that pupils who traced over key elements of maths problems were able to solve other questions that extended the initial maths problem further, showing that the tracing was helping them develop a deeper, more flexible understanding of the problem-solving methods.

http://theconversation.com/finger-tracing-can-help-students-solve-maths-problems-54034

 

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What are children thinking about at this time of year?

If a lesson connects directly with what is on the children’s minds, then the speed and depth of learning is greatly enhanced.

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Filed under Key Stage, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Mathematics, Teaching Ideas

Jump, shout and draw the times tables

What is the most effective way of teaching times tables to every child?

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A mighty times table problem solved

Teachers Hannah Allum and Hannah Smart developed The Mighty Multiples Times Tables Challenge to improve maths attainment. They share their tips on how to replicate its success in the Guardian online.

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Filed under Key Stage, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Mathematics, National Curriculum, Teaching Ideas

Free creative teaching resource – maths magic

Use this magical mental maths activity to motivate pupils into playing with numbers. Once hooked, they will want to try the method out again and again.

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Filed under Key Stage, Key Stage 2, Mathematics, National Curriculum, Teaching Ideas