Tag Archives: Primary school

Say No to Bullying

It’s easy to get your free assembly story, The Witness, for anti-bullying week!

‘Ranpresh is terrified of ‘The Gang’ and gets attacked on the way home from school. Hannah is a witness but she is afraid to do anything about it. At last she finds the courage to be part of the solution rather than being part of the problem.’

Download your free copy of ‘The Witness’ to find out what happens to Ranpresh and Hannah.

This story is taken from More Brilliant Stories for Assemblies, a collection of over 50 stories for use in primary schools. The stories range from those dealing with specific issues, such as bullying, racism and disability, to historical and religious stories.

The stories can be used at specific times of the year, when issues arise or whenever you are suddenly called upon to do an assembly!

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Filed under Assemblies, Brilliant Publications, Citizenship, Key Stage, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Primary school, PSHE, Teaching Ideas

Are your children watching the Europa League Final tonight in Baku?

Football is fun for so many children and it provides rich resources for reluctant readers. No matter who wins tonight, Arsenal or Chelsea, for many people it will the source of fun, discussion and disagreement. Sheila Blackburn has written a series of stories about football specifically designed for reluctant readers in promote schools. As you will know, one of the challenges with reluctant readers is capturing their attention and imagination. Stories about football are one solution to this, particularly when as well written as these ones and at a time when UK teams will win the Europa League and the Champions League.

Sam’s Football Stories are specially written to stimulate and motivate slower learners and reluctant readers. Written by Sheila Blackburn, an experienced primary school teacher, the six compelling stories in Set A, tell the story of Sam, a football crazy boy. Let your pupils follow this dream come true for Sam and his friends. Join in the fun and excitement as they begin training, pick a team, join a league and enter a tournament.

 

These books:

  • provide stimulation and motivation especially for slower learners and reluctant readers
  • have gripping story lines make children want to read the next book
  • are compatible with the Primary Literacy Strategy category of everyday stories
  • are designed to look like books more able readers are reading with attractive covers and black and white illustrations inside
  • have carefully controlled vocabulary and sentence structure for easy reading
  • have an increasing number of words per book as you progress through the series
  • have a clear font and print style

To extend the stories further, use the Teacher’s Guide – Your Chance to Score!, a photocopiable teacher resource linked to the stories in Set A.

Like to try before you buy? Request your free copy of the e-book Football Crazy, the first story in the series, now by emailing info@brilliantpublications.co.uk

Click here to find out more about the books

Click here to see a sample page.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, English, Key Stage 2, lesson plans, National Curriculum, Primary school, Reluctant reader, reluctant readers, slow reader, Teaching Ideas, textbooks

Free Grammar and Punctuation activities addressing the requirements of the English Programmes of Study for KS1 and KS2

A pupil who is well-spoken is not necessarily a pupil who can write well, not least because he/she might speak with perfect punctuation and grammar but have difficulty applying the same rules to his/her writing. Continue reading

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, English, homework, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Primary school

A Gift for you on World Teachers’ Day!

5th October is World Teachers’ Day!

To celebrate we are offering a 20% discount on all the books and resources on the Brilliant Publications’ website. To get your discount, place your order as normal, then type in WTD18 when asked for a coupon code. Don’t forget to press ‘Apply Coupon’ to get your discount. Please feel free to share this offer with your friends!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please have a look at our easy to use resources, which feature engaging approaches to learning, so as to inspire and motivate preschool, primary and secondary school pupils across the wide range of curriculum areas. With resources for English, maths, French, Spanish, science, physical education and art (to name a few) – we hope we have something for you. There are free sample pages for each book, so you can try before you buy!

This offer expires Monday, 8th October 2018.

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Filed under Brilliant Publications

We are giving away ‘Bonjour, ca va?’ to anyone who requests it!

Request your FREE copy of the Bonjour, ça va? Worksheet Collection

« Includes song lyrics, an embedded audio track, a music sheet and teacher’s notes

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Filed under Brilliant Publications, French, Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Modern Foreign Languages (MFL), Teaching Ideas

Spanish story to teach parts of the body

In Me duele, it’s Luis’s birthday party and he shows off his new bike to his friends. ¡Ay! he cries. Mamá and Papá come rushing outside. Is Luis OK? Will the party go ahead as planned?

The story is a fabulous way of introducing the Spanish names for parts of the body and describing what hurts.

Me duele - Learn Spanish with Luis y Sofía

Me duele – Learn Spanish with Luis y Sofía 

As with all Luis y Sofía stories, there’s a twist at the end. Barbara Scanes, the author, says that she used her own children (who are now in their 20s!) as role models when thinking of what Luis and Sofía would do.

Written entirely in Spanish this original, fun story uses repetitive phrases and simple sentences to embed vocabulary and language structures, making it ideal for Spanish beginners.

With engaging, full colour pictures and simple language on every page, this book can be read to, by and with children of any age.

Children with early Spanish language skills will gain confidence, and develop their language skills, when they realise they are able to read and understand a storybook in Spanish.

An audio enhanced e-storybook of this story is available exclusively as part of  the Learn Spanish with Luis y Sofía 1a Parte Starter Pack.

 

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Filed under Key Stage 2, Spanish

From Outstanding, is the only way to go down?

‘Nobody wants to lead an outstanding school. There is nowhere to go other than down!’ So said an erudite colleague to me when I mentioned that I was looking to move on to lead another school. It was not without a small degree of trepidation therefore that I was appointed to my second headship a short while later – this time to lead an outstanding school. Two years in we were re-inspected and again achieved outstanding. The relief was palpable. When I had taken on the school, I felt it was no longer excellent – good, yes but outstanding no. In the space of two years we managed to get the data back to excellent – without it you won’t achieve the outstanding label. Although, perversely, having the data is by no means a guarantee of getting the accolade. What inspectors see in the classroom must reflect what the data suggests – excellent practice.

How to be a Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher by Gary Nott

How to be a Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher by Gary Nott

In my new book, How To be A Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher, I outline some of the facets of an outstanding school, whilst trying to describe some of the features that people attribute to outstanding leaders.

Two of these school features spring to mind in writing this blog entry.

Firstly, we coined the term Mentoring Mondays to describe our approach to supporting colleagues to develop their practice. I nabbed the idea from McDonald’s Fruit Fridays when sharing a snack with my son. On each Monday morning, we would release a teacher to observe a colleague teach an outstanding lesson. Then on the Monday afternoon, the released teacher would team teach a lesson to their own class alongside that outstanding colleague. The end of the day would be spent sharing key lessons learned during the day. Colleagues appreciated this investment in them. The cost of releasing colleagues from class responsibilities to benefit from such an exercise on the one day was easily offset by money saved from the external courses budget.

Secondly, we devised a simple way of tracking children’s progress in the school that was bespoke to our children. We took an aircraft flight as our analogy. We quantified progress and attainment using a points systems we devised and from this could calculate a class’s progress – which we called ‘speed’ – and their attainment – which we called ‘altitude’ – which we then brought together in what we called a cockpit summary. A class could be flying high and fast or low and slow. The visual representation of this on a cockpit dashboard led us to create flight plans for each class – showing where we wanted them to be (their destination) and when we expected their flight to land. Was their flight on time or likely to be delayed? Inspectors liked the idea and suggested that we go further and devise a flight plan summary for each child.

The difficult thing of course is maintaining the outstanding label. It can itself become somewhat of a cross to bear. Some staff feel that to maintain the high standard is not achievable if they are to maintain a healthy work-life balance. As the new Head of OFTSED considers dropping it from her armoury, there will be many in the profession keen to see it go. I have found that my own school has seen significant changes in the past five years. The percentage of children entering the school at below levels that are typical for age has doubled. This has brought new challenges – and opportunities to grow too. In such circumstances, to hold on to the outstanding label is a big ask. You have to keep reinventing yourself; if you stand still there is indeed only one way to go, as my former colleague said to me.

Guest blog by Gary Nott.

Gary Nott author of How to be a Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher

Gary Nott author of How to be a Brilliant Primary School Head Teacher

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Filed under Guest blog, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, School leadership